How to Tap Unlimited Funding for Your Real Estate Deals

If you poll a group of real estate investors on what they need right now in their business, 9 out of 10 of these investors would say “money” to do more deals! One of the best unlimited funding sources is utilizing retirement accounts. A recent statistic states that there are two TRILLION dollars held in retirement accounts; however, only 2% of these accounts are invested in real estate! In this free webinar, Matt Faircloth (Author of BP’s book on Raising Private Capital) is going to teach you how to tap one of the best unlimited funding sources for your real estate deals!
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OTHER ON-DEMAND WEBINARS

Advising HOA Boards After Surfside: Inspection, Review, Maintenance and Repairs

The aftermath of the Surfside condominium collapse is one of the most unspeakable tragedies in condominium history. As investigators continue to search for the cause or causes of the collapse, it is natural to search for solutions on how future building collapses or other disasters can be prevented. It is unlikely that there will be a "single" identifiable cause of the condominium collapse. Rather, the collapse was likely caused by a multitude of factors. Counsel for HOAs should consider reviewing policies and actions of the condominium association's board of directors. Most states provide various protections for volunteer directors of a nonprofit corporation and only require that a director must discharge their duties in good faith, with the care of an ordinarily prudent person, and in a manner that they believe is in the best interests of the corporation. Directors should ensure that their articles of incorporation and condominium bylaws are updated so volunteer directors are appropriately protected from liability. Similarly, volunteer board members should consult with insurance agents to ensure that appropriate directors' and officers' insurance is in place. Boards will want to examine inspection and engineering reports and communicate those findings to co-owners to determine the advisability of proceeding with repairs. Counsel should advise condominium board members to act on the advice that is received. Boards need to budget properly and realize that sometimes difficult choices need to be made, which may involve assessment increases that will not be popular with co-owners. Some condominium documents require the condominium association to perform an annual inspection of the major common elements. While hiring professionals to perform inspections costs money, amending your condominium bylaws to require mandatory inspections may not be a bad idea. Similarly, while reserve studies are a best practice, there is nothing preventing a condominium association from amending their condominium bylaws to require that reserve studies or structural engineering inspections be performed on a regular basis. While condominium and homeowner association acts may not impose minimum insurance requirements, boards should consider reviewing coverage and increasing limits based on current risks. Listen as our expert panel discusses best practices when advising boards on repairs, inspections, and engineering recommendations for condominiums in order to avoid future disasters.
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COVID Strategies For Seniors Housing Operators — Managing Risk For Residents, Staff and Service Providers

To mandate or not to mandate? As seniors housing operators grapple with staffing shortages while prioritizing resident and staff safety, varying strategies have emerged around the national push for COVID vaccinations. How are operators rolling out their COVID protocols as we head into the home stretch of 2021 and the winter flu season? And how are non-staff — including visiting family members and on-site service providers who support operators — being guided?
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Drafting for Real Estate Lawyers

Understand the concepts and organization underlying residential and commercial real estate transaction documents.Residential and commercial real estate transactions are built upon the documents which lay out the terms and conditions for those transactions. In order to be effective, those documents must contain clearly articulated concepts and be organized so the parties to the transactions, and sometimes finders-of-fact (that is, judges and juries), can interpret those documents. It is a best practice if real estate transaction documents are designed and constructed from a proactive risk management perspective, using checklists to ensure the relevant substantive and procedural matters are addressed and not inadvertently dropped. This topic is intended to help real estate professionals such as developers, owners, property managers, engineers, surveyors, contractors, and attorneys understand how to prepare and review real estate documents in a variety of settings such as purchase and sale transactions, leases, development projects, shared ownership/management/cost-sharing arrangements (condominiums, cooperatives, owner associations), and mortgage financings.
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Construction Management Agency: Not at Risk?

Lorman Business Center

As in-house expertise declines, public and private owners of construction projects are increasingly outsourcing the management and administration of their construction projects to professional construction managers-agents. Use of professional construction managers can help protect owners from liability to other project participants because construction managers are often more knowledgeable and better qualified than an owner's personnel to properly address claims.
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